Cadel Evans to be Australias first Tour De France Winner… (Musical tribute: Kraftwerk – Tour De France)


Kraftwerk – Tour De France (Original Red Label Version) as our little tribute to the first Australian Tour  winner..

Not much needs to be said about Kraftwerk really as im pretty sure everyone who knows anything about music will know exactly what electronic music today owes Kraftwerk. I doubt there is a BBoy in the world who wont get amped hearing this on a floor or a record enthusiast that wouldn’t have this in their collection.

Download Kraftwerk Original Tour De France 1983 Version.

Along with being one of the releases that shaped electronic music, Tour also has its small spot in clubbing/rave history here in Sydney too. I have heard from a few people over the years about watching in awe as local DJ Stephen Allkins (Love Tattoo), regularly sample & played this back & forth with Salt & Peppers Push It at Sydneys infamous R.A.T parties at the Horden in the late 1980′s.

Check this info on RAT parties in Sydney from Powerhouse museum online;

During the 1980s in Sydney’s inner-east, a series of more than 35 parties organised by the Recreational Arts Team (RAT) formed a key element of an emerging subculture. The core of the self-styled Recreational Arts Team was Jac Vidgen, Billy Yip and Reno Dal. Vidgen, an energetic party-thrower who had come to Sydney from Brisbane, became the de facto promoter and organiser of these so-called RAT parties. Yip was an artist with a wildly creative imagination who developed well co-ordinated themes and design concepts for the parties. His striking graphic concepts were applied to posters, fliers, badges and banners. Reno Dal was the team’s original technical designer and producer, who started the events with Vidgen and Yip in 1983 and remained involved until 1986. Mark Taylor was the technical producer for the peak period 1986-1990, while Wayne Gait-Smith was technical designer.Vidgen threw his first public party for 200 guests at a rat-infested house on Cleveland St on 2 October 1983, because his own private parties had become too large and expensive. He had no idea he was setting in train a phenomenon that led to a multitude of dance parties every year. Each party had a special name, usually conceived by Billy Yip, incorporating the word ‘rat’ in its title. The first official RAT party, titled ‘Ratsurrect’ and advertised through word-of-mouth, was held at the Bondi Pavilion on Easter Sunday, 22 April 1984. The early parties, particularly ‘Ratizm’ at the Paddington Town Hall (April 1985), created a buzz, attracting an inner-city party-going crowd that included heterosexual bohemians as well as gay men and drag queens. RAT parties typically had audio-visual presentations, bizarre props, party drugs, innovative lighting, underground cabaret groups, the best DJs in town and unusual live performances by people like Martin Harsono and Simon Reptile, who performed at most of these events.What began as a creative exercise became a business. In 1987 Vidgen registered Recreational Arts Team Pty Ltd as a company. The events became larger, and were no longer exclusive eastern suburbs affairs where it was necessary to know the right people to obtain a ticket. The parties became famous for their spectacular entertainment and celebrity guests. ‘A Ratty New Year’, held on New Year’s Eve 1988 and featuring a 4am live performance by Grace Jones, was so popular that it filled both the Hordern Pavilion and the Royal Hall of Industries. The audiences ranged from 200 to 14,000 guests, with budgets from $5,000 to $400,000. However Vidgen’s motivation was not financial gain. Business was risky, profits were slim, and money made on one party was frequently lost on the next one. Vidgen described himself as ‘an event producer committed to celebration’ (Sydney Morning Herald 13/9/89).

RAT parties provided a venue for a circle of creative people to express themselves on a larger scale than had previously been available, providing a stepping stone for some to move to other levels of expression. Billy Yip is now a painter of fine art. Tobin Saunders, who is now better known as Vanessa Wagner, used to help on the decor team and performed at many of the parties with his dance group. Other contributors were the visual artist Anthony Babicci, the entertainer Ignatius Jones, and Tim Gruchy, who was responsible for much of the video production and recording at the events, particularly in the later years. The parties were vividly documented in photographs by William Yang.

The RAT parties were forerunners of the dance parties and raves of the 1990s. In the early 1980s pub rock was still the mainstream, and dance music was an underground phenomenon. Any music that utilised electronic instruments other than guitars was regarded as weird or avant-garde. RAT party enthusiasts eschewed rock, preferring recorded electronic music and dance music provided by pioneering DJs like Tim Ritchie, Robert Racic and Pee Wee Ferris.

Spearheaded by these DJs, Australian dance music took off in the 1980s. Ignored by major record labels, the dance movement followed the same path as the punk ethic: do-it-yourself. Following Vidgen’s lead, competing independent promoters booked nights at tired old venues like the Hordern Pavilion and transformed them into vibrant, packed palaces. Sydney’s gay community, in particular, took to dance parties. As well as RAT parties, the Mardi Gras, Sweatbox and Bacchanalia are now spoken of as some of the best parties held, featuring DJ sets from the likes of Ritchie, Racic, Ferris, Stephen Allkins and Paul Holden. The buzz of these parties spread to the UK with that country’s top DJs keen to take part. Warehouses emerged, some becoming the foundation of local rave culture. By the end of the 1980s parties flourished all around the country, with promoters booking a constant flow of influential overseas DJs such as Paul Oakenfold. While established rock venues suffered from lack of attendance, dance parties were frequently sold out.

The RAT parties altered Sydney’s night life, starting a craze for giant dance parties that lasted in to the 1990s. They provided a diverse range of entertainment based on visual and aural stimulation, provided a creative outlet for talented people and set the tone and style of Australian dance music culture.

Read more: http://www.powerhousemuseum.com/collection/database/?irn=319666#ixzz1PGnVkBul
Under Creative Commons License: Attribution Non-Commercial

Cadel Evans to be crowned Tour winner

Updated July 24, 2011 01:48:41 Evans starts time trial

Cadel Evans will become the first Australian to win the Tour de France, having secured the yellow jersey in the penultimate stage of cycling’s most famous race.

Starting the day trailing Andy Schleck by 57 seconds, Evans produced a masterful performance in the 42.5-kilometre time trial in and around Grenoble to seize an advantage of one minute and 34 seconds.

Evans finished second in the time trial with a performance of 55:40.26, just seven seconds behind Germany’s Tony Martin.

The last stage to Paris is traditionally a procession for riders in the overall classification with the main action coming from the sprinters on the Champs Elysees.

Evans scorched around the undulating course in the heart of the French Alps in overcast conditions.

After near misses in the 2007 and 2008 editions of the Tour, Evans’ triumph is a massive moment for the sport in Australia.

The victory makes the 34-year-old the oldest winner of the Tour in the 88 years since Henri Pelissier finished on top in 1923.

Such has been the dominance of Europeans at the Tour, that Evans is only the third champion to have come from outside the continent’s clutches.

Evans’ performance also ticks one of the few remaining boxes on Australian sport’s ‘to do’ list.

The weight of the achievement must be considered up there with the nation’s finest sporting moments such as Australia II winning the 1983 America’s Cup.

It completes a remarkable journey after growing up in the Northern Territory and almost being killed at the age of eight after being kicked in the head by a horse.

Evans moved to Victoria in his teenage years and made his name as a mountain biker before transferring his talents to the road.

After being less than a minute away in 2007 and 2008 from capturing cycling’s holy grail, Evans struggled with favouritism in 2009.

However only months after his disappointing 30th finish, he became the first Australian to win the men’s road race world title.

He changed teams in late 2009 and went to BMC, but a fractured elbow from a crash at last year’s Tour ruined his chances of challenging the leaders.

On this year’s tour, he has not been under as much pressure and Sunday morning (AEST) was the first day that he had worn the yellow jersey.

He had been happy to mark his time before the time trial with spirited pursuits of lead groups in the final two mountain stages proving pivotal to his success.

Evans’ cleanskin reputation is a bonus for cycling’s image as it tries to clean up its reputation following decades of drugs controversies.

Ex-team-mates of seven-time Tour de France champion Lance Armstrong have accused the American of taking banned substances, while three-time winner Alberto Contador tested positive for anabolic agent clenbuterol at last year’s Tour.

The Spanish Cycling Federation cleared him of any offence and Contador’s appeal will be heard at the Court of Arbitration for Sport next month.

Brian Kirkham was the first Australian to ride in the Tour in 1914, with the legendary Hubert Opperman participating for the first time in 1928.

But it was not until 1981 that an Australian slipped on the yellow jersey for the first time in Phil Anderson.

Since then several Australians have worn the famous jersey, but only Evans has threatened to climb to the top step on the Champs Elyses with it on.

 

ELECTRO FUNK,DISCO: Giorgio Moroder – Midnight Express/The Chase Theme (RARE1978 Original Extended 14 Min Mix)


Download Original Epic 14 Min Version thanks to (DJ Philippe B ONLINE)

Also came accross this Nu-Disco remix; Giorgio Moroder VS Martin Brodin-The Chase 2011 (Martin Brodin Remix)

Download @ Phonica Records

Hansjörg “Giorgio” Moroder (on record sleeves often only Giorgio) (born 26 April 1940, Gröden,

Electronic Dreams: Giorgio Moroder Film + Musi...

Image by 92YTribeca via Flickr

Italy) is an Italian record producer, songwriter and performer based in Los Angeles. When in Munich in the 1970s, he started his own record label called Oasis Records, which several years later became a subdivision of Casablanca Records. His work with synthesizers during the 1970s and 1980s had a significant influence on New Wave, house, techno and electronic music in general. Particularly well known for his work with Donna Summer during the era of disco (including “Love to Love You Baby” and “I Feel Love“), Moroder is the founder of the former Musicland Studios in Munich, which was used as a recording studio for artists including Electric Light Orchestra, Led Zeppelin, Queen and Elton John.

In addition to producing several hits with Donna Summer, Moroder also produced a number of electronic disco hits for The Three Degrees, two albums for Sparks, and a score of songs for a variety of others including David Bowie, Irene Cara, Madleen Kane, Melissa Manchester, Blondie, Japan, and France Joli.

Music career

Moroder made his first steps in music in Berlin, Germany by releasing a few singles under the name “Giorgio” beginning in 1966, singing in Italian (as George, to explain his German accent), Spanish, English, and German. He came to prominence in 1969, when his recording “Looky Looky”, released on Ariola Records, was awarded a gold disc in October 1970.Often collaborating with lyricist Pete Bellotte, Moroder had a number of hits in his own name including “Son of My Father” in 1972 before releasing the synthesizer-driven From Here to Eternity, a notable chartbuster in 1977, and in the following year releasing “Chase“, the theme from the film Midnight Express. These songs achieved some chart success in the UK, the U.S., and across Europe, and everywhere disco-mania was spreading. The full movie score for Midnight Express won him his first Academy Award for best film score in 1978. In 1979, Moroder released his album E=MC². Text on the album’s cover stated that it was the “first electronic live-to-digital album.” He also released three albums between 1977-1979 under the name Munich Machine.

In 1984, Moroder worked with Philip Oakey of The Human League to make the album Philip Oakey & Giorgio Moroder; which was a UK singles chart hit with “Together in Electric Dreams“, title track to the 1984 movie Electric Dreams. In 1986, Moroder collaborated with his protégé Harold Faltermeyer (of “Axel F.” fame) and lyricist Tom Whitlock to create the score for the film Top Gun (1986), with the most noteworthy hit being Berlin‘s “Take My Breath Away“. “Chase” was also used as an entrance theme for wrestling’s group The Midnight Express. In 1987, Moroder produced Falco‘s song “Body Next to Body”.

In 1997, Moroder and Donna Summer won the Grammy Award for Best Dance Recording for the song “Carry On”.

On 20 September 2004 Moroder was honored at the Dance Music Hall of Fame ceremony, held in New York, when he was inducted for his many outstanding achievements and contributions as producer. In 2005, he was given the title of Commendatore by the then President of the Italian Republic, Carlo Azeglio Ciampi. On September 5, 2010 Moroder received the Great Order of Merit of the South Tyrol.

Film work

Moroder won three Academy Awards: Best Original Score for Midnight Express (1978); Best Song for “Flashdance…What a Feeling“, from the film Flashdance (1983); and Best Song for “Take My Breath Away“, from Top Gun (1986).

Moroder also won two of his three Grammy Awards for “Flashdance”: Best Album Of Original Score Written For A Motion Picture Or A Television Special and Best Instrumental Composition, for the track “Love Theme from Flashdance”.

In 1984, Moroder compiled a new restoration and edit of the famous silent film Metropolis and provided a contemporary soundtrack to the film. This soundtrack includes seven pop music tracks from Pat Benatar, Jon Anderson, Adam Ant, Billy Squier, Loverboy, Bonnie Tyler and Freddie Mercury. He also integrated the old-fashioned intertitles into the film as subtitles as a means of improving continuity, and he also played the film at a rate of 24 frames per second. Since the original speed was unknown this choice was controversial. Known as the “Moroder version”, it sparked debate among film buffs, with outspoken critics and supporters of the film falling into equal camps.

ELECTRO FUNK: Kraftwerk – Tour De France (1983 Red Label Full Version)


Not much needs to be said about Kraftwerk really as im pretty sure everyone who knows anything about music will know exactly what electronic music today owes Kraftwerk. I doubt there is a BBoy in the world who wont get amped hearing this on a floor or a record enthusiast that wouldn’t have this in their collection.

Kraftwerk, along with Giorgio Moroder, Jean Michel Jarre and a few others were THE GODFATHERS OF ELECTRONIC MUSIC!

Download Original

Along with being one of the releases that shaped electronic music, Tour also has its small spot in clubbing/rave history here in Sydney too. I have heard from a few people over the years about watching in awe as local DJ Stephen Allkins (Love Tattoo), regularly sample & played this back & forth with Salt & Peppers Push It at Sydneys infamous R.A.T parties at the Horden in the late 1980’s.

Check this info on RAT parties in Sydney from Powerhouse museum online;

During the 1980s in Sydney’s inner-east, a series of more than 35 parties organised by the Recreational Arts Team (RAT) formed a key element of an emerging subculture. The core of the self-styled Recreational Arts Team was Jac Vidgen, Billy Yip and Reno Dal. Vidgen, an energetic party-thrower who had come to Sydney from Brisbane, became the de facto promoter and organiser of these so-called RAT parties. Yip was an artist with a wildly creative imagination who developed well co-ordinated themes and design concepts for the parties. His striking graphic concepts were applied to posters, fliers, badges and banners. Reno Dal was the team’s original technical designer and producer, who started the events with Vidgen and Yip in 1983 and remained involved until 1986. Mark Taylor was the technical producer for the peak period 1986-1990, while Wayne Gait-Smith was technical designer.Vidgen threw his first public party for 200 guests at a rat-infested house on Cleveland St on 2 October 1983, because his own private parties had become too large and expensive. He had no idea he was setting in train a phenomenon that led to a multitude of dance parties every year. Each party had a special name, usually conceived by Billy Yip, incorporating the word ‘rat’ in its title. The first official RAT party, titled ‘Ratsurrect’ and advertised through word-of-mouth, was held at the Bondi Pavilion on Easter Sunday, 22 April 1984. The early parties, particularly ‘Ratizm’ at the Paddington Town Hall (April 1985), created a buzz, attracting an inner-city party-going crowd that included heterosexual bohemians as well as gay men and drag queens. RAT parties typically had audio-visual presentations, bizarre props, party drugs, innovative lighting, underground cabaret groups, the best DJs in town and unusual live performances by people like Martin Harsono and Simon Reptile, who performed at most of these events.

What began as a creative exercise became a business. In 1987 Vidgen registered Recreational Arts Team Pty Ltd as a company. The events became larger, and were no longer exclusive eastern suburbs affairs where it was necessary to know the right people to obtain a ticket. The parties became famous for their spectacular entertainment and celebrity guests. ‘A Ratty New Year’, held on New Year’s Eve 1988 and featuring a 4am live performance by Grace Jones, was so popular that it filled both the Hordern Pavilion and the Royal Hall of Industries. The audiences ranged from 200 to 14,000 guests, with budgets from $5,000 to $400,000. However Vidgen’s motivation was not financial gain. Business was risky, profits were slim, and money made on one party was frequently lost on the next one. Vidgen described himself as ‘an event producer committed to celebration’ (Sydney Morning Herald 13/9/89).

RAT parties provided a venue for a circle of creative people to express themselves on a larger scale than had previously been available, providing a stepping stone for some to move to other levels of expression. Billy Yip is now a painter of fine art. Tobin Saunders, who is now better known as Vanessa Wagner, used to help on the decor team and performed at many of the parties with his dance group. Other contributors were the visual artist Anthony Babicci, the entertainer Ignatius Jones, and Tim Gruchy, who was responsible for much of the video production and recording at the events, particularly in the later years. The parties were vividly documented in photographs by William Yang.

The RAT parties were forerunners of the dance parties and raves of the 1990s. In the early 1980s pub rock was still the mainstream, and dance music was an underground phenomenon. Any music that utilised electronic instruments other than guitars was regarded as weird or avant-garde. RAT party enthusiasts eschewed rock, preferring recorded electronic music and dance music provided by pioneering DJs like Tim Ritchie, Robert Racic and Pee Wee Ferris.

Spearheaded by these DJs, Australian dance music took off in the 1980s. Ignored by major record labels, the dance movement followed the same path as the punk ethic: do-it-yourself. Following Vidgen’s lead, competing independent promoters booked nights at tired old venues like the Hordern Pavilion and transformed them into vibrant, packed palaces. Sydney’s gay community, in particular, took to dance parties. As well as RAT parties, the Mardi Gras, Sweatbox and Bacchanalia are now spoken of as some of the best parties held, featuring DJ sets from the likes of Ritchie, Racic, Ferris, Stephen Allkins and Paul Holden. The buzz of these parties spread to the UK with that country’s top DJs keen to take part. Warehouses emerged, some becoming the foundation of local rave culture. By the end of the 1980s parties flourished all around the country, with promoters booking a constant flow of influential overseas DJs such as Paul Oakenfold. While established rock venues suffered from lack of attendance, dance parties were frequently sold out.

The RAT parties altered Sydney’s night life, starting a craze for giant dance parties that lasted in to the 1990s. They provided a diverse range of entertainment based on visual and aural stimulation, provided a creative outlet for talented people and set the tone and style of Australian dance music culture.

Read more: http://www.powerhousemuseum.com/collection/database/?irn=319666#ixzz1PGnVkBul
Under Creative Commons License: Attribution Non-Commercial

 

Everything ██is█████ ████ ████fine ███ █ ████ love. ████ █████ the ███ Egypt ███ ████ government ██ Vs Egyptian Lover – Egypt Egypt !


Everything ██is█████ ████ ████fine ███ █ ████ love. ████ █████ the ███ Egypt ███ ████ government ██

Ok we never get too political on here, but I was actually just reading the tweets on #Egypt and have a guess what tune popped up on shuffle…

The Egyptian Lover – Egypt Egypt

Classic 808 Electro banger if there has ever been one..

If your keen on the 80’s Electro & Classic RAP vibes like this then stay close to our good mates @ COLD CRUSH for mixtapes, write ups and club nights pushing the old school sounds in Sydney.

I-F TLR Viewlexx Creme Organization Intergalactic FM Sydney GodspillNext Cold Crush Gig:

Friday February 11

I-F & TLR, Cold Crush DJs (Simon Caldwell, OSC-001, RETALI8 & Mattamation), Slow Blow & NHJ (Meccanoid Melbourne)

Tone, 16 Wentworth Ave Surry Hills

More Info @ Facebook

HAHA Presents: Juan Atkins Live in Sydney (Sat Nov 27)


http://profile.ak.fbcdn.net/hprofile-ak-snc4/hs1319.snc4/161900_118245171568847_1039717_n.jpgIs in town for one night only.

A legend who is widely credited with inventing Techno Music as we know it today is playing an upcoming show in Sydney.

In anticipation for this upcoming event, We leave you with one of many Juan Atkins classics.

Catch Magic Juan play

in this Sat 24 @ Marricville Bowling club,

With Vince Watson + Dean Dixon & Dave Fernandes (HAHA Industries)

Click for More Gig Info

Peace

Wassim G

 

Soul Of Sydney Podcast #9 – Journey through Cosmic Disco, Boogie & Chicago House Vibes, Mixed By Sloppy Seconds


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Soul Of Sydney Podcast #9

A 75min trip through Cosmic Disco, Boogie and even some classic Chicago House vibes. Presented with luv by Sydney based Re-mixer, DJ, Label Owner and Blogger, Sloppy Seconds.

Download: Here

Time: 75 Mins

Size:110MB

Tracks

01. Bumblebee Unlimited “I Got a Big Bee”
02. Loleatta Holloway “Hit & Run”
03. Skyy “First Time Around” Kenny Dope Main Mix
04. Skyy “First Time Around” Kenny Dope Drums
05. Marlena Shaw “Woman of the Ghetto” 4AM Rework
06. Koto “Chinese Wargames”
07. Toby Tobias “Crocodile Tears”
08. We’re Lofty Volt “Alter Flaw”
09. The Orb “Perpetual Dawn” (Pal Joey Cumulo Nimbus Mix)
10. Kraftwerk “Musique Non Stop”
11. NYC Peech Boys “On A Journey” 12″ Vocal Mix
12. Mantronix “Listen to the Bass”
13. Edwin Birdsong “Son of a Rapper Dapper Snapper”
14. Julia & Company “Breakin’ Down”
15. Whodini “Escape” Instrumental
16. Stevie Nicks “Stand Back”
17. Space Ranger “Phase Fever”
18. Dolle Jolle “Balearic Incarnation” (Todd Terje’s Extra Mix)
19. Larry Heard “Dance of Planet X”

Download: Download: Here

About Sloppy Seconds

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Sloppy Seconds is;

A re-edit label (Sloppy Seconds – get it?).  You can find me digitally on Juno for now.  I do have plans to press up vinyl sometime in the near future.  The material that I plan on using for the vinyl releases will be titles exclusive to the wax catalogue (I have a secret stash saved specifically for this purpose).  I’ll let you all know when that happens.

A music resource website. I’ve been collecting vinyl since the early/mid 80’s and have amassed quite an amount of relatively obscure stuff and started the blog as a way to promote lesser known artists and their releases.  Because of the controversy surrounding mp3s I had originally intended to only post titles that are out of print, but I also realized that there are tons of new releases that are equally as amazing that weren’t being promoted very well.  The music selection there varies greatly and includes just about anything that moves me and/or  makes me laugh.  Here’s the addy.  Make yourselves at home.  Beer is in the fridge.

http://kennyconga.blogspot.com/

(For the record, I have received numerous emails stating that purchases of posted material were made due to promotion of said titles from the blog.)

And a DJ.  I’ve been DJing for quite some time now.  Most of you have never heard of me, which might have something to do with the severe lack of self promotion over the years – I never liked that part of the job, but I’ve come to the conclusion that the self promotion game needed to be stepped up if I wanted to continue to do this.

More from Sloppy Seconds

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Connect With Soul Of Sydney

Sloppy Seconds comes to Sydney!


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Greetings!  We come in peace!

I’m a recent Sydney transplant.  Born and raised in Hawaii I have spent most of my adult life in San Francisco (I’ve also lived in San Diego and Chicago).  I can be a bit reserved at first, so I thought no better way to introduce myself and tell you about my background than through my record collection.  I have been religiously collecting those round discs of plastic since the early/mid 80’s, so we have a lot to cover.

If Grandmaster Flash on the Wheels of Steel was what opened my eyes to the world of DJing, then Grandmixer D.ST.‘s “Megamix II:  So Why Is It Fresh?” is what caused me to purchase my first pair of turntables.  “Megamix II” was a collage of snippets and excerpts of records taken predominately from the genre shattering Celluloid label with some brief flashes of Herbie Hancock’s “Rockit” thrown in (D.ST.’s first megamix was a similar working of songs mostly taken from Herbie Hancock’s “Future Shock” album as a promotional tool by Columbia to promote Herbie’s album.  Here’s another tidbit of useless information – “Rockit” was the first fusion of hip hop and jazz on wax.).

The liner notes on the back of the record listed the equipment used for “Megamix II”, and I remember it being not much more than two turntables, a mixer, some sort of recording device, a couple of keyboards and a drum machine – a perfect example of it’s not what you have, but it’s what you do with what you have.


Grandmixer D.ST. “Megamix II:  Why Is It Fresh?” @ 320

Here are some of the records used in “Megamix II” in its original form.

Coming up next  – how I discovered something called house music.

(I heart Paddy’s!)

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Connect With Soul Of Sydney

DAM FUNK Mixes: Payday! Live Mix (May 08) + Station 23 anniversary mix (April 09)


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Mix #1 :

DAM FUNK

Pay Day! Hollywood

May 2008

Time: 40 Mins

Format: .mp3

Style: Electro Funk, Boogie & Disco

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From freethescene.com

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Dam Funk wrote the book on boogie, funk, and street cred.

When you see this guy live as soon as he walks into the room all the sudden it gets funky. Just everything about this guy is Funk.

When he DJs it’s all 100% wax original pressings, 2 turntables,an old school casio microphone (to keep the MC sounding backyard boogie status), and Los Angeles’s funkiest dude going to town on the decks. This is first DJ I have ever seen where I thought, “Thank GOD this guy exists, DJing is still progressing to another level, and this world isn’t doomed by sorority girls djing their Britney mashups through itunes”.

Enough talking, enjoy this golden set, let me know what you think.

download

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Mix #2 :

DAM FUNK,

2nd Anniversary Mix for Station 23 Radio

April 2009 Continue reading

DAM FUNK + Toni Toni Lee (Live), Gian Arpino & Japeye Bennett + Podcasts & Interview


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Niche Productions present:

DAM FUNK

Sat 15th @ The Basment

Supported by:

Toni Toni Lee (Live), Gian Arpino and Japeye Bennett

Facebook


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Niche Productions is proud to present the debut Australian tour of the ambassador of Boogie-Funk, Dâm-Funk (Stones Throw – Los Angeles, California). Bursting on to the scene in 08-09, Dâm (pronounced ‘Dame’, as in Damon) won over a slew of fans from Disco-Boogie aficionados, the Beat scene, hardcore Hip Hop heads and Hipsters alike with his debut 12″ ‘Burgundy City/Galactic Fun.’

In 2009, he was one of Stones Throw busiest artists, putting out so much material you’d think he was giving Madlib a run for his money, with the ‘Toeachizown’ album being released digitally in five instalments, all of which teased fans with different elements of his influences. During this time he also managed to put out a few mix CDs, a beat tape as part of Stones Throw’s  ‘Rhythm Trax’ series and turned in remixes for Red, Baron Zen and superstars Animal Collective. At the tail end of 2009, the album was released in 2CD and deluxe 5LP box set editions.

His Monday night Funkmosphere club night is the stuff made of legends. From record-dealer types with obscene collections to a heavily bearded Joaquim Phoenix and beyond, it’s the spot that everyone is trying to get in to. But Dâm’s roots go well back to a time before ‘Disco’ was a cool word.

Cutting his teeth as a session keyboard player for artists of the G-Funk era like Mack 10, MC Eight and Westside Connection, you can easily hear his hip-hop roots in songs like ‘Hood Pass Intact’, and even though he dresses the part, don’t expect Dâm to get all thugged out on us out here on his debut tour. Dâm-Funk promotes love, spirituality, astrology and good vibes with his music and his open and outward personality – if you’ve ever heard him be interviewed or seen live clips online, you will know he is very generous with his time.

Calling his sound ‘Modern Funk’,Dâm-Funk’s live show takes in both his impeccable DJ mixing style as well as a Live-PA style side which includes vocals and keyboards, showcasing both the original material he writes and records, and the records which have inspired him.

Join us for the show everyone will be talking about for the rest of the year.

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Check out the Dam Funk Interview today on Soul Glow radio

DJ Huwston interviews Dam Funk his show Soul Glow on 2ser 107.3

Soul Glow Radio 3pm every Tuesday,

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Mixes & Podcats

#1 Dam Funk, BBC’s Radio: Mary Anne Hobbs Experimental Show, May 1 09

  1. DâM-FunK – ‘Brookside Park’ (Stones Throw)
  2. DâM-FunK – ‘Spacecapades’ (Stones Throw)
  3. DâM-FunK – ‘This Time, Take It Out On the Groove’ (Stones Throw)
  4. DâM-FunK – ‘Flying V Ride’ (Stones Throw)
  5. DâM-FunK – ‘The Sky Is Ours’ (Stones Throw)
  6. DâM-FunK – ‘Sidewayz’ (Stones Throw)
  7. DâM-FunK – ‘Rollin’ (Stones Throw)
  8. L.S. Movement – ‘Move Everything You Got’ (LA/Veg)

or download

#2 Dam Funk 3hr Mix up on BBC Radio 25th Oct 09

Track listing

  • BaronZen – Burn Rubber (Dam-Funk Remix) (Stones Throw)
  • Dam-Funk – Burgundy City (Stones Throw)
  • Dam-Funk – Red (Stones Throw)
  • Dam-Funk – Special Dimensions (Stones Throw)
  • Dam-Funk – Killdatmutha***a (Stones Throw)
  • Dam-Funk – Galactic Fun (Stones Throw)
  • Dam-Funk – She Lights Me Up (Stones Throw)
  • Dam-Funk – 10 West (Stones Throw)
  • Dam-Funk – Chocolate (Stones Throw)
  • Dam-Funk – Indigo (Stones Throw)
  • Dam-Funk – Rollin’ (Stones Throw)
  • Dam-Funk – Purple (Stones Throw)
  • *Dam-Funk In The Mix*
  • Pyramid Plus – Comin At Ya (Lifeworld)
  • Del Richardson – Rainbows (Joy Spring)
  • Cliff Dawson – I Can Love You Better (Boardwalk)
  • Midnight Express – Dangerzone (Tri-Fire)
  • Rah Band – Messages From The Stars (TMT)
  • StarShine – All I Need Is You (Prelude)
  • Alfreda James & Billy Ray – Back To Love (Rappers Rapp Disco)

[tweetmeme source=”soulofsydney” only_single=false]

Cold Crush: Electro-Funk Rap &; Boogie Night Fri 16th April + Simon Caldwell &; DJ Hysteric Electro-Boogie Mixes


Cold Crush

‘More Bounce To The Ounce’

Part two of Sydney only 80’s Electro Funk & Rap Night is back THIS Friday 16th @ 202 Broadway

click for more info or FB event

Kicking off nice and early at 9pm with an extend FUNK & BOOGIE set by local BBOY DJ SAGE ONE who featured in the first podcast

Also the one & only DJ Hysteric — the perpetrator behind Melbourne’s legendary System electro parties up from Burn City to rock the decks with the Cold Crush Mob — that’s RETALI8, OSC-001 & Simon Caldwell, along with special guest boogie man Sage One: bboys b-ware!

You know the drill, old school vinyl mixing, dope cuts and ya’ll party freaks ripping up the dancefloor. 202 have a new sound system in too, it is fat and YOU KNOW Cold Crush gonna be rocking those bass-bins.

Cold Crush electro mixes

Cold Crush Electro Mixtapes

#1 Simon Caldwell Live @ Cold Crush Dec 4 2009

Tracklist:

  1. Hashim – Al-Naafiysh (The Soul)
  2. Egyptian Lover – Freak-A-Holic
  3. Bumper – Tuff Groove
  4. R-Damski – Project Pt. 1
  5. Def Cut – I Pay Back
  6. Mobile Space Unit – Eruption
  7. The Artificial Arm – Welcome To The Planet Funk
  8. Suat G – B-Boy Bonus Beats
  9. Sven Vath – Schubduse (Anthony Rother Remix)
  10. Resident Alien – Radio Killer
  11. DMX Krew – Bass Mission
  12. A1 People – Do It
  13. Thomas Schumacher – When I Rock (Anthony Rother Remix)
  14. Subway – Testing (Dexter Remix)
  15. Chromatix – Cranioplasmatron
  16. The Freeek – Martian Leaders O.E.
  17. DJ Godfather – Aliens Got The 808
  18. Egyptian Lover – Egypt, Egypt
  19. Mental Blox – Bass Synthesiser
  20. Uprock – Klockwerk Oranj
  21. Biochip C – Steal It And Deal It (DMX Krew Edit)
  22. Anthony Rother – Compression
  23. Third Electric + Artificial Material – High Tension Wires
  24. The Artificial Arm – You’ve Been Messing With My Mind
  25. Afrika Bambaataa & The Soulsonic Force – Planet Rock

Download @ Cold Crush

With this set I was trying to play a whole bunch of my favourite electro tunes, mainly focusing on newer tracks with a bit of an old school vibe, and trying to tie them in with a few classic oldies. It was mixed with the dancefloor in front of me, so I tried to keep it pretty beat-based, but managed to get some spacey vibes in there too. I love how this kind of music makes really abstract things funky. It’s like the machines are making the music themselves if the sounds and the feel all click together; it’s organic and artificial at the same time. Unfortunately I don’t get to play these tunes very much any more (the complete rape of the word ‘electro’ hasn’t helped) so it was fun to drop them at Cold Crush. Hopefully you enjoy the mix and can have a little body-pop to it.
Simon Caldwell

Download

#2 Hysteric – Electro Will Never Die

More info + interview here & electro mixes here

Cold Crushin’ Mixes is back with a slamming electro mix from Melbourne mix master and certified wax addict Hysteric, who has done some hardcore crate digging to pull some very obscure tracks for us! But don’t let the fact that you have probably never heard of most of the tracks put you off — as unknown as many of the tracks might be to all but the most knowledgeable of electro fans, our homeboy Hysteric has put together an absolute banger of a mix, covering a range of styles from bboy electro funk and electro rap, to synth pop, minimal electro, new wave and some very heavy hitting sludge electro tracks from The Hague. Ya’ll should know what to expect by now from Cold Crushin’ Mixes, so needless to say, shit is off the chain!

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