DEEP HOUSE, FRANCOIS K: Nina Simone – Here Comes The Sun (Francois K. Remix)


I first found out about this in 2006 on the NINA SIMONE Remixed & Reimagined release, which features some amazing reworking of Nina Simone’s work but this by far is the stand out cut on the record. It is another formative remix by legendry Body & Soul NYC DJ François K.  Remixing the implausible voice Nina Simone in ‘Here Comes The Sun’ into another one of those timeless epic DEEP-House cuts he is so well known for releasing.

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DISCO, DEEP HOUSE: Rufus & Chaka Khan – Ain’t Nobody (Frankie Knuckles Hallucinogenic Remix)


Rufus & Chaka Khan – Ain’t Nobody (Frankie Knuckles’ Hallucinogenic MIX)

This was a classic Disco cut to begin with & when someone like Frankie Knuckles gets hold of the masters, you know its going to be a special moment in HOUSE music.  If you ask me it is also one of the finest bits of remixing work he has ever put his name to.  The man just seems to have a such a great ablity to remix R&B & Soul into a House like nobody else.
Have a look at some of the artsits he has remixed;

I am looking for this on vinyl too if anyone has it for sale please get in touch at facebook.

Ce Ce Rogers – Someday ( Club Mix )


 

Originally released in 1987, “Someday” was an inspired collaboration between the raw driving house sound of Chicago legend Marshall Jefferson and the sweet, hauntingly soulful voice of CeCe Rogers. The result was the creation of a powerful political message highlighting the need for racial harmony in apartheid South Africa. The popularity of this beautiful piece of music has seen it ranked number 3 in MixMags‘s 100 Greatest Singles of All Time.

 

 

 

 

DEEP HOUSE: Hercules & Love Affair – Blind (Frankie Knuckles Remix)


DFA Records

Image via Wikipedia

Hercules and Love Affair is a musical project from New York based DJ Andy Butler. Members include Andrew Butler, Kim Ann Foxman, Mark Pistel, Aerea Negrot, and Shaun Wright.It is signed to DFA Records.

The single “Blind” featuring guest Antony Hegarty (lead vocalist in Antony & The Johnsons) was released on 3 March 2008, and the debut album (produced by Butler and Tim Goldsworthy) was released on 10 March.Their self-titled album has been critically well-received and charted in the top 40 in several countries. The touring group in 2008 featured guest vocalist Nomi Ruiz.

The first single “Blind“, co-written by and featuring guest Antony Hegarty (lead vocalist in Antony & The Johnsons), was awarded Best Song of 2008 by Pitchfork Media and came in at sixth place in Resident Advisor‘s Top 30 tracks of that year. The follow-up “You Belong” featured the New York-based vocalist and musician Nomi Ruiz.

From WIKI

HIP HOP DOCUMENTARY: J Dilla


J Dilla aka Jay Dee R.I.P

On Saturday Febuary 13th, 2010 Stussy celebrated the life of brilliant hip hop producer and rapper James “J Dilla” Yancey, by releasing a limited edition tee shirt produced in conjunction with Stones Throw and the Dilla Estate. http://www.stussy.com for more details.

Part #1

Part one of a three part documentary on J Dilla

Part #2

Part two of a three part documentary focusing on J Dilla’s life in Los Angeles.

Part #3

Part three of a three part documentary focusing on J Dilla’s life in Los Angeles.

ELECTRO FUNK: Kraftwerk – Tour De France (1983 Red Label Full Version)


Not much needs to be said about Kraftwerk really as im pretty sure everyone who knows anything about music will know exactly what electronic music today owes Kraftwerk. I doubt there is a BBoy in the world who wont get amped hearing this on a floor or a record enthusiast that wouldn’t have this in their collection.

Kraftwerk, along with Giorgio Moroder, Jean Michel Jarre and a few others were THE GODFATHERS OF ELECTRONIC MUSIC!

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Along with being one of the releases that shaped electronic music, Tour also has its small spot in clubbing/rave history here in Sydney too. I have heard from a few people over the years about watching in awe as local DJ Stephen Allkins (Love Tattoo), regularly sample & played this back & forth with Salt & Peppers Push It at Sydneys infamous R.A.T parties at the Horden in the late 1980’s.

Check this info on RAT parties in Sydney from Powerhouse museum online;

During the 1980s in Sydney’s inner-east, a series of more than 35 parties organised by the Recreational Arts Team (RAT) formed a key element of an emerging subculture. The core of the self-styled Recreational Arts Team was Jac Vidgen, Billy Yip and Reno Dal. Vidgen, an energetic party-thrower who had come to Sydney from Brisbane, became the de facto promoter and organiser of these so-called RAT parties. Yip was an artist with a wildly creative imagination who developed well co-ordinated themes and design concepts for the parties. His striking graphic concepts were applied to posters, fliers, badges and banners. Reno Dal was the team’s original technical designer and producer, who started the events with Vidgen and Yip in 1983 and remained involved until 1986. Mark Taylor was the technical producer for the peak period 1986-1990, while Wayne Gait-Smith was technical designer.Vidgen threw his first public party for 200 guests at a rat-infested house on Cleveland St on 2 October 1983, because his own private parties had become too large and expensive. He had no idea he was setting in train a phenomenon that led to a multitude of dance parties every year. Each party had a special name, usually conceived by Billy Yip, incorporating the word ‘rat’ in its title. The first official RAT party, titled ‘Ratsurrect’ and advertised through word-of-mouth, was held at the Bondi Pavilion on Easter Sunday, 22 April 1984. The early parties, particularly ‘Ratizm’ at the Paddington Town Hall (April 1985), created a buzz, attracting an inner-city party-going crowd that included heterosexual bohemians as well as gay men and drag queens. RAT parties typically had audio-visual presentations, bizarre props, party drugs, innovative lighting, underground cabaret groups, the best DJs in town and unusual live performances by people like Martin Harsono and Simon Reptile, who performed at most of these events.

What began as a creative exercise became a business. In 1987 Vidgen registered Recreational Arts Team Pty Ltd as a company. The events became larger, and were no longer exclusive eastern suburbs affairs where it was necessary to know the right people to obtain a ticket. The parties became famous for their spectacular entertainment and celebrity guests. ‘A Ratty New Year’, held on New Year’s Eve 1988 and featuring a 4am live performance by Grace Jones, was so popular that it filled both the Hordern Pavilion and the Royal Hall of Industries. The audiences ranged from 200 to 14,000 guests, with budgets from $5,000 to $400,000. However Vidgen’s motivation was not financial gain. Business was risky, profits were slim, and money made on one party was frequently lost on the next one. Vidgen described himself as ‘an event producer committed to celebration’ (Sydney Morning Herald 13/9/89).

RAT parties provided a venue for a circle of creative people to express themselves on a larger scale than had previously been available, providing a stepping stone for some to move to other levels of expression. Billy Yip is now a painter of fine art. Tobin Saunders, who is now better known as Vanessa Wagner, used to help on the decor team and performed at many of the parties with his dance group. Other contributors were the visual artist Anthony Babicci, the entertainer Ignatius Jones, and Tim Gruchy, who was responsible for much of the video production and recording at the events, particularly in the later years. The parties were vividly documented in photographs by William Yang.

The RAT parties were forerunners of the dance parties and raves of the 1990s. In the early 1980s pub rock was still the mainstream, and dance music was an underground phenomenon. Any music that utilised electronic instruments other than guitars was regarded as weird or avant-garde. RAT party enthusiasts eschewed rock, preferring recorded electronic music and dance music provided by pioneering DJs like Tim Ritchie, Robert Racic and Pee Wee Ferris.

Spearheaded by these DJs, Australian dance music took off in the 1980s. Ignored by major record labels, the dance movement followed the same path as the punk ethic: do-it-yourself. Following Vidgen’s lead, competing independent promoters booked nights at tired old venues like the Hordern Pavilion and transformed them into vibrant, packed palaces. Sydney’s gay community, in particular, took to dance parties. As well as RAT parties, the Mardi Gras, Sweatbox and Bacchanalia are now spoken of as some of the best parties held, featuring DJ sets from the likes of Ritchie, Racic, Ferris, Stephen Allkins and Paul Holden. The buzz of these parties spread to the UK with that country’s top DJs keen to take part. Warehouses emerged, some becoming the foundation of local rave culture. By the end of the 1980s parties flourished all around the country, with promoters booking a constant flow of influential overseas DJs such as Paul Oakenfold. While established rock venues suffered from lack of attendance, dance parties were frequently sold out.

The RAT parties altered Sydney’s night life, starting a craze for giant dance parties that lasted in to the 1990s. They provided a diverse range of entertainment based on visual and aural stimulation, provided a creative outlet for talented people and set the tone and style of Australian dance music culture.

Read more: http://www.powerhousemuseum.com/collection/database/?irn=319666#ixzz1PGnVkBul
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