OUR HOUSE NYD SPECIAL – SECRET LOCATION REVEALED


A BIG THANK YOU TO THOSE WHO HAVE PURCHASED TICKETS FOR OUR NEW YEARS DAY CELEBRATION!! THE LAST FEW REMAINING TICKETS CAN BE PURCHASED FROM www.ourhousesydney.com. THE VENUE LOCATION IS ALSO UP ON THE WEBSITE. WE WILL ALSO BE GOING PAST 1AM, SO ANYONE LOOKING TO KICK ON AFTER THE FESTIVALS HAVE FINISHED CAN CALL PHIL ON 0415 164 425 OR EMAIL ourhouse_sydney@optusnet.com.au

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Our House returns this NYD to celebrate the new year – underground style.

Join us in our indoor/outdoor sanctuary as we delve deep into our record collections for the finest House, Garage, and Disco gems.

Music selectors include James Bucknell, Gian Arpino, Phil Hudson, Phil Toke, Michael Zac, Eadie Ramia, Toby Wilson, and The Latin Jam Crew (Live).

Tickets are $20 from www.ourhousesydney.com.

Presale tickets only. Strictly limited capacity. BYO

*This party is proudly supported by Soul Of Sydney – Funk, Disco, and House music Blog.

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Podcast#11 – 'Cumbiambero Loco 2' An Afro-Latin Caribbean Expedition in to ‘Cumbia’ Hosted By: Jack Posada


Soul Of Sydney Podcast #11

https://i1.wp.com/i1.soundcloud.com/artworks-000003391722-qc65cx-original.jpg

‘Cumbiambero Loco’ Part 2 –

An Afro-Latin & Caribbean Expedition in to ‘Cumbia’

Mixed By: JackPosada (Myspace, Soundcloud)

This is the second installment of cumbiambero loco, a special ‘CUMBIA’ mixtape carefully selected just in time for that summer time in Sydney.

Spanish:
CUMBIA que delicia, que viva diciembre y feliz navidad

Our podcast this week is a little different to the standard ‘Funk’ we been featuring, it is an unexpected & enjoyable voyage into Caribbean & Afro-Latin beats.

This week we present a 40 min mix of traditional Colombian rebellion music called ‘Cumbia’.

Style: Afro Latin, Cumbia & Caribbean Percussion

Download Here

Email: soulofsydney@gmail.com

Tracks

  1. Andres Landero – Virgen de la candelaria
  2. Los Gaiteros de San Jacinto – Manuelito barrios
  3. Calixto Ochoa – Charanga campesina
  4. Los Cumbiamberos – Santo domingo
  5. Afrosound – La sampuesana
  6. Pacho Galan – Cumbia alegre
  7. Sonoritmos – Pola bette
  8. Climaco Sarmiento y su Orquesta – Maquina landera
  9. Pacho Galan – Cumbia que me alegras
  10. Pacho Glan – La mazamorrera
  11. Los Golden Boys – La negra celina
  12. Calixto Ochoa – Los sabanales
  13. La Sonora Cordobesa – El pajaro picon
  14. Pedro Laza y sus Pelayeros – La pringamoza

About ‘Cumbia’

The word ‘Cumbia’ came from the African word “Cumbé”, or party. It’s known as the queen of African rhythms & It has 3 cultural influences (African, Andean & Spanish).

The music originated around the 1820’s during Colombia’s struggle for independence as an expression of national resistance against Spain.

Both the African & Andean influences are obvious in ‘Cumbia’, the rhythms adopted from African slaves used by the Spanish & Andean flutes & poetry make up the core elements of the music .

Originally only performed with drums & claves it has since evolved to include; flutes, guitars, accordion, horns, brass & traditional drums & percussion.

Today it is very popular in Latin America & has even evolved into new forms mixed with Ska, Reggae, Hip Hop & Drum N Bass known as ‘Cumbia digital’ These elements & influences can be found in the music of ; Quanic, Ozomatli, DJ Spinna, Los Lobos & Los Kumbia Kings.

Even in Australia it will be featured at the 2010 Big Day Out Lilly Pad.

For a good introduction to ‘Cumbia’, check out: Cumbia Cumbia , Vol. 1 & 2 released by World Circuit Records (1983, 1989).

Download Here

Connect With Soul Of Sydney

Podcast#11 – ‘Cumbiambero Loco 2’ An Afro-Latin Caribbean Expedition in to ‘Cumbia’ Hosted By: Jack Posada


Soul Of Sydney Podcast #11

https://i1.wp.com/i1.soundcloud.com/artworks-000003391722-qc65cx-original.jpg

‘Cumbiambero Loco’ Part 2 –

An Afro-Latin & Caribbean Expedition in to ‘Cumbia’

Mixed By: JackPosada (Myspace, Soundcloud)

This is the second installment of cumbiambero loco, a special ‘CUMBIA’ mixtape carefully selected just in time for that summer time in Sydney.

Spanish:
CUMBIA que delicia, que viva diciembre y feliz navidad

Our podcast this week is a little different to the standard ‘Funk’ we been featuring, it is an unexpected & enjoyable voyage into Caribbean & Afro-Latin beats.

This week we present a 40 min mix of traditional Colombian rebellion music called ‘Cumbia’.

Style: Afro Latin, Cumbia & Caribbean Percussion

Download Here

Email: soulofsydney@gmail.com

Tracks

  1. Andres Landero – Virgen de la candelaria
  2. Los Gaiteros de San Jacinto – Manuelito barrios
  3. Calixto Ochoa – Charanga campesina
  4. Los Cumbiamberos – Santo domingo
  5. Afrosound – La sampuesana
  6. Pacho Galan – Cumbia alegre
  7. Sonoritmos – Pola bette
  8. Climaco Sarmiento y su Orquesta – Maquina landera
  9. Pacho Galan – Cumbia que me alegras
  10. Pacho Glan – La mazamorrera
  11. Los Golden Boys – La negra celina
  12. Calixto Ochoa – Los sabanales
  13. La Sonora Cordobesa – El pajaro picon
  14. Pedro Laza y sus Pelayeros – La pringamoza

About ‘Cumbia’

The word ‘Cumbia’ came from the African word “Cumbé”, or party. It’s known as the queen of African rhythms & It has 3 cultural influences (African, Andean & Spanish).

The music originated around the 1820’s during Colombia’s struggle for independence as an expression of national resistance against Spain.

Both the African & Andean influences are obvious in ‘Cumbia’, the rhythms adopted from African slaves used by the Spanish & Andean flutes & poetry make up the core elements of the music .

Originally only performed with drums & claves it has since evolved to include; flutes, guitars, accordion, horns, brass & traditional drums & percussion.

Today it is very popular in Latin America & has even evolved into new forms mixed with Ska, Reggae, Hip Hop & Drum N Bass known as ‘Cumbia digital’ These elements & influences can be found in the music of ; Quanic, Ozomatli, DJ Spinna, Los Lobos & Los Kumbia Kings.

Even in Australia it will be featured at the 2010 Big Day Out Lilly Pad.

For a good introduction to ‘Cumbia’, check out: Cumbia Cumbia , Vol. 1 & 2 released by World Circuit Records (1983, 1989).

Download Here

Connect With Soul Of Sydney

PUSHING BOUNDARIES: ELECTRIC WIRE HUSTLE (gig review at Tone Bar, Sydney)


So this review has taken a while to write due to personal issues I had to ride out… Alas…

That’s all we wanted. ONE. MORE. SONG. Just one more….

When one talks about ‘pushing boundaries’, this entails a level of thinking that differs from the average person, an execution of this thought pattern that challenges the existing modes of thinking, unlocking a part of one’s mind to the possibility that there is more to experience, more to learn, more to express and more to feel. Tone Bar experienced this level of exertion when Electric Wire Hustle stepped foot on stage for their debut album launch performance in Australia. It has been a while since I’ve wanted a live act to play one more song. It wasn’t just a plea of my own, but a collective  of EWH fans bellowing from sporadic parts of the dance floor, encouraging New Zealand’s next level artists to play just one more song. It didn’t happen, but what did happen that night showed Sydney fans that EWH have what it takes to take the music industry up another notch. Their unique form of sonic self expression is something unlike I’ve heard in the last 10 years, so to see them before my own eyes with adoring fans was indeed one of the highlights of 2010.

Wearing a brown leather jacket and a black hoodie underneath, lead singer MARA TK took to the stage armed with his unique soulful vocals, his electric and bass guitar,with a chilled attitude that the rest of the band seemed to naturally ooze. An attitude that set the right ‘tone’ for the rest of the night. They were just three unassuming musicians playing because they love it. Keyboardist David “TaayNinh” Wright played every note with a head nod that was contagious. Their set list comprised of most tracks from their album and a surprise performance cover of Curtis Mayfield’s ‘Move on Up’ with New Zealand’s Isaac Aesili on the trumpet, Rachel Fraser singing backing vocals, and Sydney sider Simon Kaye on the flugal horn. That in itself was a supreme highlight of the night, with each musician showcasing their skills on each instrument.

As much as I dislike focusing on one individual, particularly when the quality of performance on a whole was of high quality standards, special mention has to go to EWH’s drummer, classically jazzed trained Myele Manzanza. I’m not a drummer so excuse the lack of cohesive terminology, but Myele played off beat, on beat, triplets, grabs, with a solo moment showcasing his high skills – he teased the crowd. Myele played as you would expect a free jazz improv drummer to, with just the right quietness to allow the others members to shine. If it’s not the melody that captures my attention, it has to be the beat and Myele’s drumming moved me to do my infamous air drumming through-out the entire night.

Once again, thank you to Niche Productions for pushing the envelope, knowing what real music is and sharing it with us all. Log on to their website for new sohws in the new year! Next year will be a huge one for live music! HUGE!

If you get the chance to see Electric Wire Hustle live at some point in your life, do it! Many blogs on line have praised this New Zealand band including Okay Player having given this album 91 out of 100. I can’t stress enough how much this band will explode on to the international music scene. It’s better than Kanye West’s recent album. There. I said it.

Happy Christmas and don’t drink AND drive!