Track of The Day: Floating Points – People's Potential


Acid goodness from London’s Floating Points AKA Sam Shepherd. A funky ass acid inspired bassline with some jazzy piano thrown in.

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Track of The Day: Floating Points – People’s Potential


Acid goodness from London’s Floating Points AKA Sam Shepherd. A funky ass acid inspired bassline with some jazzy piano thrown in.

Playground Weekender 2011 Line up: ROY AYERS, DE LA SOUL, KOOL & THE GANG, NORMAN JAY, LTJ BUKEM, TOM MIDDLETON, MEEM, KINGTIDE..


 

LTJ Bukem in 2006

Image via Wikipedia

 

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PGWE Teaser Line Up Drops…

Featuring some dope soul, funk, hip hop and DNB acts. The organisers  are really going all out to push some great music and put on a different kind of event for us. This one should be pretty special, just check out the line up;

DOVES / KOOL & THE GANG / DE LA SOUL / KATE NASH / CARIBOU / FOUR TET / ROY AYERS / TUNNG / HUNGRY KIDS OF HUNGARY / TORO Y MOI / NORMAN JAY MBE / DAMIAN LAZARUS / TOM MIDDLETON / DAMIAN LAZARUS / BELLERUCHE / LTJ BUKEM / DJ HEIDI / CANYONS / DANIMALS / KING TIDE  ROSKA / CLIVE HENRY STRANGE TALK / MEEM

Have a look at this playground tribute video we made a while back to get an idea of what to expect…

Vodpod videos no longer available.

Track of the Day: Martin Circus – Disco Circus (François Kervorkian Rmx) 1979


Thanks to Gian Arpino for this original disco banger, expect more of the same this weekend at Electric Avenue Saturday Oct 9th at Tone (16 Wentworth Ave, Surry Hills).

Catch Gian alongside Koolade, Meem & Cam Brown paying tribute to the last 40 years of underground club music.

More info at the event on FB

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About Electric Avenue

ELECTRIC AVENUE is a monthly get-down, where ears and feet are led astray by a soulfully quixotic blend of house, disco, hip-hop, neo-soul, techno and boogie bombs.

Between them, EA’s resident jocks Gian Arpino & Cameron Brown have been pushing these styles for 30 years and will be calling on only the finest local and international musical friends to help them continue spreading the gospel.

So, if you have a penchant for classic throwbacks mixed with future classics, and enjoy the tasty stylings of dancefloor doyens like Theo Parrish, Maurice Fulton, Mr Scruff, Idjut Boys, Unabombers, Larry Levan, Walter Gibbons, Greg Wilson, DJ Utern, Dam Funk, and David Mancuso, then Electric Avenue is the new Sydney address for you to set your night soul free!

See you on the floor…

Electric Avenue Group

Track of the Day: Chic – Good Times (1979)


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‘Good Times‘ composed by legendary bassist Bernard Edwards and Nile Rodgers was first recorded by their band Chic in 1979 for their album Risqué.

The song has become one of the most sampled tunes in music history, most notably in hip-hop tunes;

The lyrics are largely based on Milton Ager‘s “Happy Days Are Here Again.” It also contains lines based on lyrics featured in “About a Quarter to Nine” made famous by Al Jolson. Nile Rodgers has stated that these depression-era lyrics were used as a hidden way to comment on the then-current economic depression in the United States.

In late 1979, Debbie Harry suggested that Nile Rodgers join her and Chris Stein at a Hip hop event in a communal space taken over by young kids and teenagers with boom box stereos, who would play various pieces of music to which performers would break dance. The main piece of music they would use was the break section of “Good Times.” A few weeks later, Blondie, The Clash and Chic were playing a gig in New York at Bonds nightclub. When Chic started playing “Good Times,” rapper Fab Five Freddy and members of the Sugarhill Gang jumped up on stage and started freestyling with the band; Rodgers allowed them to “do their improvisation thing like poets, much like I would playing guitar with Prince.”

A few weeks later Rodgers was on the dance floor of New York club LaViticus and suddenly heard the DJ play a song which opened with Edwards bass line from “Good Times”. Rogers approached the DJ who said he was playing a record he had just bought that day in Harlem. The song turned out to be an early version of “Rapper’s Delight” by The Sugarhill Gang, which Rogers noted also included a scratched version of the song’s string section. Rogers and Edwards threatened The Sugarhill Gang with legal action, which resulted in them being credited as co-writers on “Rappers Delight”.

In the USA “Rapper’s Delight” did not achieve as much chart success as “Good Times” (peaking at #36 on the U.S. pop chart and #4 on the American R&B charts, compared to Chic’s #1 peak on both charts) but it helped to popularize the bassline and the song, and it became one of the most sampled tracks (and hence one of the most distinctive basslines) in the history of recorded music. Having agreed on a commercial structure for the use of their song in “Rappers Delight”, Edwards and Rodgers agreed to later uses in other songs, subject to their strict criteria.